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Fabric Portraits Workshop

Registration is now open for the online fabric portraits workshop – Facial Expressions.

Fabric portrait of a young boy by a student of the Facial Expressions Workshop

Student’s work from the Facial Expressions workshop.

Fabric portrait of a young woman by a student of the Facial Expressions Workshop

Student’s work

If you have been wanting to learn all about creating fabric portraits this is your chance!

This is an online workshop that you can do from the comfort of your own home.

Check it out here. 

I hope that you can join us!

 

 

Fibre Art – My Top 10 Picks on Facebook

           Listed in no particular order.

These are my favourite groups/pages that focus on art quilting/fibre art on Facebook and I encourage you to check them out: 

Groups:

1. Textile Fine Arts

 This group has some incredible fibre art posted on a regular basis. Wonderful eye candy!

  2.  Remade Fabric Collage Quilting

 Sandra Deprey’s group is low key and engaging. Learn different techniques and follow along with interesting challenges.

  3. Artful Quilting and Sewing  

 A great place for beginner art quilters/fibre artists to get started and show what they are working on.

 4. Fiber Arts/Mixed Media

 A great eclectic mix of fibre art and mixed media work.

 5. Collage Quilter

The mission of the Collage Quilter group is to provide a welcoming community for aspiring and experienced collage quilters. Our community enables learning, provides inspiration and promotes support of one another!

This is not a group that I have joined as yet but I know that a large number of people that I know follow it.

Pages:

6. Canadian Quilters Association

Promotes Canadian quilters and quilting in Canada. They have a comprehensive annual Canadian show that is scheduled in different cities across Canada.

Become a member, and you will receive 4 magazines a year jam-packed with quilting patterns, information, what is happening around the country, and much more!

7. Fibre Art Network

 The Fibre Art Network is a cooperative of Western Canadian fibre artists that have regular exhibits of their work and are an incredibly friendly, supportive group. This page features not only their art but other artists as well!

8. Walking Foot Quilting Designs

 Melissa Marginet shares her wonderful quilting designs based on the techniques from her book of the same name. She also posts photos of her latest quilt patterns as well.

9. Maggie Dillon

 Maggie does wonderful collage-style portraits and often shares her step by step photos of the process.

 10. Susan Carlson

 Another collage artist who creates gorgeous colourful quilts using her personal collage style.

 

          Check out these great groups/pages and enjoy the tour!

Let me know what you think of them.

Find the Time or Take the Time?

Antique watch

I keep hearing people say “If I could only find the time!”

Do we find the time or do we manage our time?

I have had a slump for a while in terms of creating my art by having allowed the business side of my art to take over.

That is when I came to the realization that to be more productive again, I needed to take control of my time again. Not find the time but take the time. A big difference!

Merriam Webster Dictionary defines “Take the time” as:

: to make an effort (to do something) : to attempt

Finding the time implies that there is a source out there somewhere that one needs to search for and has little control over. Taking the time gives back that control.

When I schedule my time and make my art a priority I get a lot done.

In my schedule, I allot time for my art, my business, relaxation, family and friends.

Once you prioritize your art, you have a clearer path. This has to be a conscious decision.  

If not, you will be busy all day and find out at bedtime that you have not left room for your art.

What to do? 

Schedule your art in the same way that you would schedule any other important task. 

I keep a somewhat loose schedule as I like to be able to take advantage of spontaneous occasions.

But I do now take time for creating my art. This is what fills me up and gives me great satisfaction.

If something comes up that I really think that I would enjoy I see how it fits in terms of everything else that is on my schedule. And determine what is the greater priority at that time.

Also, whether I would need to take time at another point in my day to make up for that change.

What are your thoughts on time? How do you manage your time? 

I would be most interested to know. Please comment!

 

Struggling with Learning a New Technique?

When I started out 9 years ago, I struggled to learn fabric portraits

My problems were identifying values, choosing fabrics and the thought of doing the stitching terrified me! My first portrait stayed in a drawer for a year before I decided I would risk stitching on it. 

I wished that there was someone out there who would give me support and help me with a step by step approach.

I did finally do the stitching on the portrait and was pleased with the result. My husband who was my guinea pig for this venture loved it and has it hanging in his office. 

I look at that portrait now and can see what I would do differently.

This is where the experience of trying new things gets you; whether it be meeting new people or trying a new technique. To a point where you can see what you would do differently and you do it to get better each time.

It is the ability to say to yourself “OK, I am going to try this…..” and then to allow yourself to take the risk that the first time may not be perfect. 

Perfection is over-rated! I have been a perfectionist most of my life. It sucks!  Only in the past few years have I developed an ability to look forward to challenges and trying new things.

This change has transformed my life! I now seek out new opportunities.but also, look for mentors that can help me with any struggles that I may have

Now I have sold my work, done commissions and shown my work in numerous shows.

Woman with art quilt of a man and his vintage motorcycle.

Artist Valerie Wilson and her art quilt – French Wonder.

Are you willing to try something new?

Take the leap! Give your self permission to try creating your first portrait.

The Facial Expressions workshop offers an in-depth look at fabric portraits and walks you through the steps one at a time with lots of feedback for whatever step you are on.

You can access the workshop on your own schedule and receive feedback and support through the private Facebook group where I am active on a daily basis.

The Live question and answer sessions will be scheduled on feedback from the students as to what times/days work best for them.

These Live sessions will be recorded and posted in the group so you can see them later if you have to miss one. 

And just in case you are wondering, you don’t need to know how to draw to take this workshop!

If you have wanted to try creating a fabric portrait there is not a better time than now!

Join us in the Facial Expressions workshop now!

If you haven’t already, join us in the Fabric Faces Facebook group where we have resources for and discuss all things relating to fabric portraits.

I hope to see you there!

Val

Visit me on Facebook 

Creating a Dynamic Fabric Portrait by Focusing on Value

Focusing on value is critical to a good result when creating a portrait, whether in paint, pencil or fabric.

When creating a realistic fabric portrait you need to have a good grasp of shadows and highlights. 

This is what is meant by value.

I have created a Free 5-day challenge on the topic of value and its use in fabric portraits.

Here’s what you will learn:

  • What a gray scale is and how this will help you to identify values.
  •  
  • How to distinguish between values so that you can choose fabrics for maximum effect.
  •  
  • The relativity of value or how one fabric can be several different values.
  •  
  • How a variety of values create depth and interest. 

And more…

 What would it be like to easily identify value and choose fabrics effortlessly?

What if you could create depth and shading in a portrait?

This can happen to you.

By putting in to practice what I’ll be teaching you in this challenge, you’ll see how easy this can be.

The challenge starts on Friday, April 26 so sign up now!

If you are interested in creating a fabric portrait in the future,  join the

Free 5-day challenge – Creating a Dynamic Fabric Portrait by Focusing on Value.

 

 

New Year – New projects

In this my new year 2019, I have been working on a variety of new ventures:

1. Finishing Projects:

  • A friend and I started a block of the month quilt called Year in the Garden in 2002. We never finished it and for a number of reasons, it got shelved. We recently dug it out again and are getting to the last bits that need to be done, the applique. This quilt has star blocks in a diamond arrangement with a large open centre that features a large amount of applique. Looking at the design now I find that my tastes have changed and I am opting for a more minimalist approach which means that it might finally get done!

 

  •  There is some progress on my artwork – I am finally finishing the stitching on my latest portrait, affectionately called “the hockey boys”.  I have called it that so often it may even end up being the name of the quilt! It takes a lot of time to sew down all those little pieces of fabric, but I am sticking at it. Even 15 minutes a day helps to make progress.
vintage fabric portrait

The hockey boys in progress

Starting Projects

  • I created a new Facebook group called Fabric Faces as a gathering spot for those interested in creating fabric portraits. We have been having a lot of fun so far!

new year and new group Fabric Faces

Included is some information on posterizing your photographs (in the files) and we recently had a challenge on the effective use of value in a portrait quilt.

The FB Live that I did as a summary of the challenge on value is now posted on my FB page. 

  • Launching Facial Expressions
    the online portrait workshop. Read all the details here.

This workshop starts next Saturday, January 26, 2019, and registration is now open. I am offering a discount of 35% off to those interested, and who contact me by midnight Wednesday, January 23, 2019. 

I will send you a discount coupon that you can use when you sign up for the workshop before midnight January 25, 2019.

Plans for the rest of the year

My plans for this year are:

  • To do more dyeing of fabric in different skin tones
  • Focus on creating more art
  • Have fun in my FB group!
  • Spend more time with my hubby
  • Try screen printing and particularly deconstructed screen printing

What are your plans for the year? COmment and let me know!

Enlarging and Printing a Photo at Home – the MAC Version

Enlarging and Printing a Photo at Home – the MAC Version

 

 

A number of people asked me about enlarging and printing a photo at home with a MAC computer after I posted on this blog about this process on a PC.

I think that I have found a way!

The first step is using a photo program called Photoscape X which is a free download. I tried the Windows version and assume that the MAC version is very similar. I feel that I can say this having watched several videos on this program (MAC version) on YouTube.

Here is what you need to do to resize a photo in Photoscape X: 

Resizing

  1. Open your photo in Photoscape X in the Editor.
  2. Choose Edit – Resize. Depending on what measurement system you use you may want to change the sizing to inches from the default millimeters.
  3. Change the size of your photo to your desired size. Click Apply.
  4. Save your photo to the original folder. Rename the file if you don’t want to overwrite your original photo!

Printing

There are at least 2 options:

Posterazor 

This is program is a free download. 

It allows you to save your photo as a PDF which can be printed on multiple pages.

Split Print

Go to the MAC App Store and look for Split Print.

The app costs $8.49. It allows you to print an enlarged photo over multiple pages on your home computer.

Comments welcome!  I would love to hear from MAC users about whether this process works for them! 

New Online Fabric Portraits Workshop

I am very excited to announce the launch of my new fabric portraits online workshop called Facial Expressions.

Me relieved that the end is in sight.

The prep has been crazy! There is a huge amount to learn when setting up an online course. Most of the learning is how to use the technology involved. There were many days when I wanted to pull all my hair out!

But now I am ready for the launch. Finally!! I am looking for people to join my Workshop Launch Team. These special people will take the workshop and offer me feedback on how I can fine tune the content.

If interested, check it out here on my Online Workshops Page.

 

 

Correcting your Mistakes 101 – A Rescue Operation

Mistakes happen! Have you worked on a project for a long time only to find out that there is a major flaw?? This was my experience recently.

The Problem

First of all, I had been letting other aspects of my business take precedence over making art. My wakeup call came when I was talking to my hairdresser the other day. She asked again how I was doing with my hockey boys. I was a little embarrassed to have to say “not much”. I decided right there and then that I would get the last pieces of fabric in place starting that day.  It only took me 2 hours and it was complete! I was elated!! 

With the assistance of my husband, I carefully took my “boys” off the design wall. My experience with having this piece on the design wall for a long time is that humidity and Steam a Seam II Lite don’t go well together. A story for another day! 

As a result, I had to make sure that all the fabric pieces were back in place before I fused all the applique. A long time later it was done. It felt so good!! I had the design complete!

I hung the piece back on the design wall and moved my work table so that I could take a good long look at it. That was when I realized to my horror that one of the 3 boys had a distinct lean to one side!!! One of those “yikes” mistakes. I was devastated. All that work and now it was ruined. 

Three boys in vintage hockey uniforms. Boy on the right is leaning to the side.

The hockey boys. Look at the guy on the right!

Of course, I did the only thing that made sense. I ranted and raved and cried a few tears. I didn’t even want to look at it.  Over the next few days, I kept going back to take a look and see if it was really as awful as I imagined. Some days I almost convinced myself that it was OK. Other days I was more realistic. 

The Solution

A few days ago I decided that it was time to stop thinking about it and to try and do something about fixing it.  It couldn’t remain as it was. I had decided on a rescue plan. 

The decision was to cut from the top of the background right down to the toe of the skate. I was hoping that I could pivot the boy on the right over to the left without distorting anything.  A very deep breath and I started!

I started by cutting the background fabric above and to the right of the boy’s head. I then cut carefully along the line of his hair on the left side, down along the edge of his sleeve and the rest of this clothes and down to the toe of the skate. Managing to loosen the fabric pieces, at the elbow and the hand where the two boys overlapped (see below), made it easier to cut them apart at that point.  I wanted to cut as close to the figure as possible without nicking any of the edges.

Detail of overlap of sleeves and mitt/hand.

Detail of overlap of sleeves and mitt/hand.

Once I had the boy on the right mostly cut out, I pivoted him towards the boy in the middle so that they overlapped more. I had to cut away parts of the mitt to avoid shadowing and decided that the boy in the middle should have his elbow on top, not underneath as originally planned, which entailed more very careful cutting.

Then I had to adjust the shadow at the elbow of the jersey, for the boy in the middle, by adding some lighter fabric, as now his arm was on top. I used white Elmer’s glue applied in tiny dots to hold the repositioned section in its new position.

The Result

It worked!! I am pleased with the result and learned that the hand-dyed fabric that I used for the sky blends beautifully when cut. My hope is that the quilting will help to hide the cut in the fabric.

Here is the after photo. Much improved.

Three boys in hockey uniforms standing straight. Mistake corrected.

Adjustments made!

I am so glad that I got up the courage to correct this piece. As a result, I have learned that making a mistake is not necessarily the end of a piece. If you give yourself time to get some emotional distance from the problem and you open your mind to the possibility of rescue, amazing things can happen. Mistakes can be corrected.

Have you ever made a mistake or mistakes in a piece that you loved? What did you do about it?  I would love to hear about your experiences! 

Solo Show Update

Read about the latest news on my art work, and an update on my solo show at the Portage & District Arts Centre in Portage la Prairie, MB held in April/May of this year.

Fred

The first portrait is a man standing in the doorway of an old building. Is it his home or is it his workshop? He is dressed in his finest clothes, which must have fit him well as a younger man, but now hang on his body. In spite of this, he displays a quiet pride and shows off his prized gold pocket watch.

Fred

Fred

I experimented with hand-dyed cheesecloth to give the effect of weedy ground, and strips of hand-dyed facial wipes for the weeds. Have you ever tried these type of materials in your work?

 

The Dandy

The next portrait was based on a picture of a young man who looked very much the dandy, so that became the name of this one. He looks very self assured and definitely has attitude. Don’t you just love the buttons on his shoes!?

The Dandy

The Dandy

It was interesting doing his face, as the shadow of the hat made everything black in the photo; with no detail. I needed to lighten the shadow and redraw the eye.

Then I ran in to another issue. I created one leg of his pants only to find that if I went with the dark shadow, as per the photo, it looked as though he was wearing a jacket and pants, not a suit, so the leg of his pants was redone.

 

Ed

The third portrait was a commission from a colleague. The photo chosen was a portrait of her husband to be completed for a birthday present. The photo she chose was one of her husband in the early 1940’s in his Air Force uniform. I sourced an original cap badge, the flash for his jacket and the uniform button to dimension to the portrait. Many thanks to Marway Militaria here in Winnipeg for their help finding these items! The hat was done with trapunto on one side to add the tilt to the hat.

Ed

Ed

 

My Solo Show

Here are some photos from the show. The first photo was taken just after the show was hung. The rest of the photos are from the Opening Night.

Pre-show

The show has been hung!

Opening-night---Ed_Willy-and-her-sister-(web)

Opening Night and the Show Banner

Wall of the gallery showing The Dandy.

Inspecting “The Dandy”

Opening-night5-(web)

Opening Night Crowd at my solo show

Opening-night6-(web)

Getting up close.

The gallery was great on PR so I had several interviews on local radio stations and a write up in two newspapers.  The evening started off with my talk about my journey as an artist, followd by a question and answer period. I invited friends and people interested in my work and we had a wonderful turnout with lots of great discussions.

Have you completed any new work recently? Do you show your work? Where do you show your work – group exhibits, quilt shows or ???